Tigers fall to Kentucky after close sets
by Derek Thompson | Sports Writer
Nov 26, 2014 | 86 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Redshirt freshman Kristel Moore plays a shot as two Alabama defenders crash the net (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
Redshirt freshman Kristel Moore plays a shot as two Alabama defenders crash the net (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
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The Auburn volleyball team fell 3-1 (14-25, 25-20, 22-25, 23-25) to the No. 15 Kentucky Wildcats Wednesday night at Auburn Arena. The Tigers (12-18, 4-13 SEC) led Kentucky (25-5, 14-3 SEC) in kills (61-60), assists (59-54) and digs (62-59) in the match, but could not keep the point advantage at the end to win enough sets. Four Auburn players finished with double-digit kills and a .278 hitting percentage. Sophomores Breanna Barksdale and Stephanie Campbell led the way with 13 kills apiece. Freshman Macy Reece recorded a team-best .455 hitting percentage with 12 kills on 22 swings, while freshman Courtney Crable collected 11 kills and added in three digs. Single-season assist record holder Alexa Filley recorded 53 assists and 15 digs for her 17th double-double of the season. The freshman leads the conference with 11 double-doubles. Junior Alyssa Ivey led the Tigers with 18 digs, while sophomore Emily Klitzke collected a team-high four blocks for the Tigers. A 5-1 run by Auburn in game two tied the match at 1-1, but the Wildcats came out on top in the last couple sets to claim the match. The Tigers will take on Mississippi State in their final home match of the season on Saturday at Auburn Arena.
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Professor of Architecture creates Auburn Gingerbread Village
by Rachel King | Community Writer
Nov 26, 2014 | 771 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Master of Integrated and Design students work with The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center chefs to build gingerbread houses. (Contributed by Paul Holley)
Master of Integrated and Design students work with The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center chefs to build gingerbread houses. (Contributed by Paul Holley)
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Paul Holley and MIDC student Lee Eckert build a house in 2011. (Contributed by Paul Holley)
Paul Holley and MIDC student Lee Eckert build a house in 2011. (Contributed by Paul Holley)
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The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center will hold the 2014 Auburn Gingerbread Village on Dec. 4 at 5 p.m. The event is free and open to the public. Guests are invited to gather in the conference center where they can enjoy hot cocoa, cider, cookies and carols, while seeing Auburn recreated in gingerbread. The gingerbread village began in 2009 when the hotel had its first village on display. Paul Holley, professor in the McWhorter School of Building Science, said he remembers the project in its beginning. The first gingerbread houses included Samford Hall, the Auburn train depot, the Auburn University Chapel and Jordan-Hare Stadium, Holley said, though he is not sure who built these first models. Hans Van der Reijden has been the managing director of hotel operations and educational initiatives at the Hotel at Auburn for 11 years. In 2011, he approached Holley with the possibility of expanding the Gingerbread Village. “We discussed adding several buildings to the model, and, later, I wanted to add the Cary-Pick House, which had just been donated to the University,” Van der Reijden said. As an academic project, Holley had a group of graduate students from the master of integrated design and construction program in the School of Building Science use laser technology to develop virtual models. This helped develop cut data to build birch plywood models to design Hargis Hall, Langdon Hall, Cater Hall and the Hotel itself. Christian Dagg, associate professor and chair of the integrated design and construction department, has built similar models over the years, though he is not personally involved with the project. “It really consists of students reconstructing these buildings from plywood and then setting the gingerbread over the models,” Dagg said. Since 2013, the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art and the President’s home were added to the village, while the models used for Langdon Hall and the chapel have been rebuilt. “This fall, Dr. Gogue requested a replica of his home that will go into their house for the holidays,” Holley said. “My son and I worked on that model.” Each year graduate students come together to recreate Auburn. Currently there is no one working on the project, but the 2014 Gingerbread Village is still expected to be on display at the Hotel. For more information guests should contact the Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center at 334-821-8200.

What do you think about the Auburn Gingerbread Village?


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College of Business dean replaces Styrofoam cups with mugs
by Nicole Fulkerson | Campus Writer
Nov 26, 2014 | 715 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print
All Styrofoam cups in the Lowder break room were replaced with individual mugs for staff and faculty. (Contributed by Joseph McAdory)
All Styrofoam cups in the Lowder break room were replaced with individual mugs for staff and faculty. (Contributed by Joseph McAdory)
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Marketing instructor, Jasmine Le, gets coffee using the mugs. (Contributed by Joseph McAdory)
Marketing instructor, Jasmine Le, gets coffee using the mugs. (Contributed by Joseph McAdory)
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Bill Hardgrave, dean of the Raymond J. Harbert College of Business, is making his college Styrofoam-free one ceramic mug at a time. Tiger Dining, the Office of Sustainability and the Waste Reduction and Recycling department eliminated all Styrofoam products from on-campus dining areas in August. The College of Business followed suit when Hardgrave replaced all Styrofoam cups in the Lowder break room with individual mugs for staff and faculty. According to Jeff Long, chief operation officer at the College of Business,the change from Styrofoam cups to mugs will save the college and estimated $3,000 per year. “We did an analysis that showed that we were spending a couple of thousands of dollars a year buying Styrofoam cups,” Long said. “We have 150 staff and faculty here in the building, and at any given day we could easily go through 250-300 cups.” The mugs cost $5, so the switch cost the college $700. The process of making Styrofoam releases toxic chemicals into the air, according to Courtney Washburn, recycling coordinator at the waste reduction and recycling department. “Making Styrofoam cups in itself is a pretty dirty process that uses chemicals that have been known to cause health issues,” Washburn said. Cheryl Woodard, Outreach program specialist for the College of Business, said this change is a great way to save money while impacting the environment positively. “I love the fact that dean Hardgrave saw the amount of money the college had been spending on paper coffee cups,” Woodard said. “I believe in an effort to save money and the environment, he chooses to give everyone in the college a coffee mug, which I think is great. It’s great to know that our dean cares about the environment.” Marketing instructor Jasmine Le said she enjoys the mugs for several reasons. “I prefer having my own cup so I can always be sure it’s clean,” Le said. “Also, if you have a guest and you want to offer them a cup of coffee or hot tea they can drink out of a nice, fancy cup instead of a Styrofoam cup.” Long said he hopes the switch to Styrofoam cups will inspire other colleges on campus to make the same changes. “There has been a push on campus [to remove Styrofoam], and we were feeding off that idea of doing the right thing for the environment,” Long said. “I think, hopefully, that when other colleges read about this, they’ll start looking at their own costs of what they are spending on Styrofoam cups.”
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Moore’s Mill Club has Sixth Annual Turkey Trot
by Kailey Miller | Community Writer
Nov 26, 2014 | 688 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Participants run and walk the one-mile or three-mile route at the Moore's Mill golf course. (Contributed by Sydnee Cleveland)
Participants run and walk the one-mile or three-mile route at the Moore's Mill golf course. (Contributed by Sydnee Cleveland)
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(Contributed by Sydnee Cleveland)
(Contributed by Sydnee Cleveland)
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The Auburn community is coming together to burn some calories and help others in the community before feasting on their Thanksgiving meals this year. The 6th annual Turkey Trot is coming up Nov. 27 at the Moore’s Mill Club in Auburn. Sydnee Cleveland, founder and director of the Turkey Trot, started the event five years ago. “I love to run and so many towns have a great Thanksgiving run and Auburn was lacking that,” Sydnee said. “A friend of mine said, ‘You should start it,’ and so I did.” The run or walk takes place on the Moore’s Mill golf course on the cart paths. Runners and walkers can choose to take the three-mile or one-mile route. “It’s a beautiful run on the golf course,” Sydnee said. “We run the back nine, there’s no traffic and there’s a great fireplace before and after the race.” The staff at Moore’s Mill Club and volunteers help to set up the premises for the run. “We build a big fire in the fireplace at the pavilion, and we set up registration tables, and we provide drinks, coffee and juice, and snacks, bagels and things like that,” said Billy Cleveland, owner of Moore’s Mill Club. “The day that the event is held it’s held early in the morning on Thanksgiving morning and everyone’s in a festive mood and ready to burn some calories.” All of the proceeds raised by the run are given to the Food Bank of East Alabama. Sydnee said they also accept donations because they keep the cost of the run fairly low so all families can afford to participate in the run. Cans of food can be donated directly to the food bank, but monetary donations can be donated at the run that morning. “It was just sort of a good fit with Thanksgiving morning with hunger and with a huge focus on feasting,” Sydnee said. “There’s so many in our community who are still hungry.” Sydnee said the event has grown over the years, but attendance sometimes depends on whether the Iron Bowl is at Auburn or at the University of Alabama. Occasionally participants dress up in costumes as Indians or pilgrims, but it is optional. The event is also timed. “The run is fairly serious, I guess, you know as far as the runners take it a little more serious than the walkers obviously,” said Greg Kebe, general manager of Moore’s Mill Club. “Last year was so cold and we still had 500 people here.” The event starts at 8 a.m., and Kebe said it’s usually over by approximately 9:30 a.m., so people still have time to cook their Thanksgiving meals. “It’s become people’s way to start their Thanksgiving as a family,” Kebe said. “They probably don’t even question it anymore as to what they’re doing on Thanksgiving. It’s the way they start their Thanksgiving every year, it’s pretty cool.” Participants can register at the event.
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Auburn slides to No. 15 in College Football Playoff rankings
by STAFF REPORT
Nov 25, 2014 | 1976 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Gus Malzahn reacts to a call. 

Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor
Gus Malzahn reacts to a call. Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor
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Following a win against Samford, Auburn has dropped to No. 15 in the latest College Football Playoff rankings, a one spot drop from last week. Up next for the Tigers is a trip to Tuscaloosa and a matchup against No. 1 Alabama. The Tide will be looking to avenge last year's 34-28 Iron Bowl loss and to clinch a spot in the SEC Championship.
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