AUEAGLE2014
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October 25, 2014
They are in SGA, Weir is an AU Plainsman - a face representing our university and they don't know how wrong that was and their friends can't own up to it. This is all what is wrong with AU SGA - they spin things to work for them and cannot see how corrupt they are. I am in Greek life and at times feel The Plainsman loathes anything SGA or Greek life does, but in this instance they were correct.
OPINION: Three areas for improvement in second half
by Eric Wallace | Sports Editor
Oct 25, 2014 | 338 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Nick Marshall (#14) scores touchdown. (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
Nick Marshall (#14) scores touchdown. (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
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While the Tigers have put themselves into serious contention for the College Football Playoff, a 38-23 loss to No. 1 Mississippi State has reduced their margin of error to zero. With its playoff destiny resting in its own hands, here are three areas Auburn will need to improve in if they wish to make it to the final. The rushing attack: The Tigers are currently averaging 262 rushing yards per game, putting them at No. 15 nationally in that category. While it might be harsh to say the rushing attack is struggling, it’s hard not to notice the difference between this season and 2013. Cameron Artis-Payne is well short of the record-breaking pace Tre Mason set as the lead back in 2013, while Corey Grant’s yards-per -carry average has dropped three yards. The senior speedster has also seen his carries gradually diminished through 2014, culminating in a season-low one carry against Mississippi State. Marshall’s rushing numbers are actually up, with the senior quarterback rushing for 100 yards in all but two games this season, but the zone read still hasn’t clicked with Artis-Payne like it did with Mason. Marshall’s elusiveness while scrambling has provided a somewhat misleading bump to his first half stats this season. Coming into the season, Mason and No. 2 overall pick Greg Robinson were widely seen as the team’s two biggest offensive departures. After six games, one thing is clear: Auburn misses fullback Jay Prosch as much as either one of them. The pass rush: Auburn has just 11 sacks through six games this season, a paltry number that forced several changes from defensive coordinator Ellis Johnson. In addition to Cassanova McKinzy’s move to defensive end in passing situations, the Tigers moved senior safety Brandon King to end during the bye week hoping to add some extra speed in the pass rush. The Tigers probably shouldn’t expect any help from injured defensive end Carl Lawson, whose torn ACL appears to be season-ending. Johnson is also hoping for a boost in production from sophomore defensive end Elijah Daniel, who may see more time rushing on the inside moving forward. Nick Marshall’s passing: It seems like it always comes back to the man calling the signals. Marshall was praised by the coaching staff in the offseason for his improved passing, but we’ve yet to see that this fall. The accuracy numbers are slightly worse- 59.4 percent in 2013 to 55.4 percent in 2014- and his tendency of missing open receivers on the deep ball hasn’t changed. Perhaps most unsettling, though, is his penchant for having balls tipped at the line, a problem that has cost Marshall many turnovers. The senior quarterback will have moments of absolute brilliance through the air and even more moments of excitement on the ground. But if Auburn wants to run the table on the road through the likes of No. 3 Ole Miss, No. 9 Georgia and No. 4 Alabama, Marshall will have to cut out the mistakes and sloppy throws. Eric Wallace is the sports editor of The Plainsman. He can be reached at sports@theplainsman.com.
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This Week in Sports | 10.25.14
This Week in Sports | 10.25.14
VIDEO: This Week in Sports | 10.25.14
by Eric Wallace | Sports Editor, Kyle Van Fechtmann | Assistant Sports Editor, Kris Sims | Multimedia Editor, and Jim Little | Community Reporter
Oct 25, 2014 | 444 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print
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C.J. Uzomah named to John Mackey Award watch list
by Derek Thompson | Sports Writer
Oct 25, 2014 | 614 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
C.J. Uzomah crossing the endzone right before his touchdown tribute dance to Lutzie. (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
C.J. Uzomah crossing the endzone right before his touchdown tribute dance to Lutzie. (Emily Enfinger | Assistant Photo Editor)
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Auburn coaches got more than they came for during a first round game of the 2008 state playoffs between North Gwinett and Lassiter high schools in Georgia. They were there to watch Lassiter’s Philip Lutzenkirchen, future Auburn football star. They got to see Lutzenkirchen haul in nine catches for 112 yards and something extra on the other side of the ball. A sophomore playing for North Gwinett stepped in at wide receiver that night because of injuries and scored three touchdowns to beat Lutzenkirchen and Lassiter 43-21. That high school sophomore was C.J. Uzomah. Lutzenkirchen, who died in a car crash in June, went on to do great things at Auburn after high school, and Uzomah was only a few steps behind him. “I heard from (Auburn) after the season was over, when I was playing basketball,” Uzomah said. “I was pretty excited about that. I have some family friends that went here, and they always talked about how great Auburn was.” Tigers’ tight end Uzomah was one of 33 players named to the John Mackey Award midseason watch list last Monday, Oct. 20. The award is given annually to college football’s top tight end. The 6-foot-5, 264-pound senior has six catches for 74 yards and two touchdowns this season. He has 24 catches for 364 yards and six touchdowns in his career. Uzomah attributed much of his football success to Lutzenkirchen at SEC Media Days. “He really opened me up out of my shell,” Uzomah said. “He really calmed me down when those bullets were flying. He has been a huge impact on my play, on my development as a football player; The ability to study film, to kind of understand coach Malzahn’s lingo, which has helped tremendously. He had a huge impact on me.” After catching a nine-yard-touchdown pass from senior quarterback Nick Marshall in Auburn’s win against LSU, Uzomah broke out Lutzenkirchen’s old touchdown celebration in the end zone, the Lutzie. “That was my attempt at it,” Uzomah said. “In my head, it just clicked right when I caught the pass to do it. That was just my tribute to him. He’s affected my life and the Auburn community tremendously.” The record-breaking tight end is not the only one who helped Uzomah get where he is today. Having strict parents helped him as well, Uzomah said. “I had to do my chores,” Uzomah said. “We have an alarm clock, and if it went off before I went home, they would cut back my curfew an hour for the whole week. If I was late from that point on, I just couldn’t go out. That helped a lot. It made me accountable.” The emphasis on family helped Uzomah decide to come to Auburn. “Auburn is like Suwanee to me,” Uzomah said. “It’s not too big and not too small. There’s an unreal atmosphere with fans and friends. I knew I’d be around good people.”
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